Academy Awards (Oscar) 2019 Complete list of winners

‘Green Book’ wins best picture

: Feb 25, 2019    : Milan Anshuman

The 2019 Oscar winners are here! It was a night of memorable moments and fabulous firsts as Green Book took home the Oscar for Best Picture. Regina King, Mahershala Ali, Rami Malek and Olivia Colman were tops in the acting categories and Spike Lee brought home Oscar for the very first time for Adapted Screenplay as a co-writer of BlacKkKlansman.

Bohemian Rhapsody scored four Oscars while Black Panther and Roma won three each with Alfonso Cuarón adding another Directing Oscar to his collection. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse won in the Animated Feature Film category and Lady Gaga gave a memorable performance of "Shallow" from A Star Is Born with Bradley Cooper before giving a memorable speech for winning for Original Song.

In addition to a best foreign language film nod, “Roma” also took home directing and cinematography Oscar for Alfonso Cuaron while “Black Panther” surprised with wins in production design, costume design, and original score.

A star-studded list of presenters also took to the stage, including chef Jose Andres, Dana Carvey, Queen Latifah, congressman John Lewis, Diego Luna, Tom Morello, Mike Myers, Trevor Noah, Amandla Stenberg, Barbra Streisand, and Serena Williams.

The evening also featured musical performances by Queen and Adam Lambert, as well as Jennifer Hudson, Gillian Welch and David Rawlings, Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper, and Bette Midler.

1. Best Picture: Green Book

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“Green Book” is a road movie set in 1962, long before Apple or Google Maps or Waze, but as it makes its way from New York to Alabama and back, you might nonetheless imagine a little GPS voice in your ear telling you what’s up ahead. There is virtually no milestone in this tale of interracial male friendship that you won’t see coming from a long way off, including scenes that seem too corny or misguided for any movie in its right mind to contemplate. “Siri, please tell me they’re not going there.” Oh, but they are.

2. Best Director: Alfonso Cuarón, “Roma”

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In “Roma,” the Mexican director Alfonso Cuarón uses a large canvas to tell the story of lives that some might think small. A personal epic set in Mexico City in the early 1970s, it centers on a young indigenous woman who works as a maid for a middle-class white family that’s falling apart. Cuarón uses one household on one street to open up a world, working on a panoramic scale often reserved for war stories, but with the sensibility of a personal diarist. It’s an expansive, emotional portrait of life buffeted by violent forces, and a masterpiece.

3. Best Actor: Rami Malek, “Bohemian Rhapsody”

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“Bohemian Rhapsody,” the song by Queen, lasts nearly six minutes, a very long time for a pop single back in 1975. A baroque blend of gibberish, mysticism and melodrama, the track is a can of earworms, one of those musical confections that get into your head whether you like it or not and stay there forever. Some of us who were devoted radio listeners in the mid-’70s will surely sit up in our death beds and whisper “Galileo, Galileo, Figaro” with our final breaths.

4. Best Actress: Olivia Colman, “The Favourite”

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In January 1711, Queen Anne, the last Stuart monarch to occupy the British throne, appointed a former chambermaid named Abigail Hill to be Keeper of the Privy Purse, thus decisively reversing the fortunes of Sarah Churchill, the Duchess of Marlborough, who had previously been among the queen’s most trusted advisers.

5. Adapted Screenplay: BlackKklansman

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In the middle of “BlacKkKlansman,” Spike Lee’s new joint — his best nondocumentary feature in more than a decade and one of his greatest — Ron Stallworth and his sergeant have an argument about the future of the Ku Klux Klan. It’s the early 1970s, and Ron (John David Washington), the first African-American officer hired by the Colorado Springs Police Department, has infiltrated the local Klan chapter and chatted on the phone with David Duke (Topher Grace), the organization’s national director.

6. Original Screenplay: Green Book

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“Green Book” is a road movie set in 1962, long before Apple or Google Maps or Waze, but as it makes its way from New York to Alabama and back, you might nonetheless imagine a little GPS voice in your ear telling you what’s up ahead. There is virtually no milestone in this tale of interracial male friendship that you won’t see coming from a long way off, including scenes that seem too corny or misguided for any movie in its right mind to contemplate. “Siri, please tell me they’re not going there.” Oh, but they are.

7. Foreign Language Film: Roma

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Few directors tell large-scale stories with as much sensitivity as Cuarón, whose filmmaking style has grown more exhilarating as the expressive realism of his breakout movie, “Y Tu Mamá También,” has been channeled into the restrained ostentation of his fantasies “Children of Men” and “Gravity.” In “Roma” he has further refined his style by marshaling various narrative strategies, including cinematic spectacle.

8. Animated Feature: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

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Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” contains a vital element that has been missing from too many recent superhero movies: fun. Most of the better specimens of the genre, as well as the worst, assume a heavy burden of self-importance: the future of the planet, the cosmic balance of good and evil, the profit margins of multinational corporations and the good will of moody fans all depend on the actions of a gloomy character in a costume.

9. Visual Effects: First Man

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In July of 1969, as the world’s attention was fixed on the spectacle of the first lunar landing, news broadcasts would sometimes flash back to a speech given by President John F. Kennedy earlier in the decade. In effect writing the check that Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins would cash a half-dozen years after his death, Kennedy vowed to send astronauts to the moon not because it is easy, but because it is hard.

10. Original Score: Black Panther

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A jolt of a movie, “Black Panther” creates wonder with great flair and feeling partly through something Hollywood rarely dreams of anymore: myth. Most big studio fantasies take you out for a joy ride only to hit the same exhausted story and franchise-expanding beats. Not this one. Its axis point is the fantastical nation of Wakanda, an African Eden where verdant-green landscapes meet blue-sky science fiction. There, spaceships with undercarriages resembling tribal masks soar over majestic waterfalls, touching down in a story that has far more going for it than branding.

11. Original Song: Shallow from “A Star Is Born”

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Bradley Cooper, Willie Nelson’s son and a real pop star masquerading as a fake pop star are among the musicians celebrating a chart-topping album this week. The soundtrack to “A Star Is Born,” the remake in which Cooper plays the country-rock singer Jackson Maine and Lady Gaga co-stars as the Gaga-esque Ally, is No. 1 on the Billboard 200, selling a total of 231,000 album equivalent units, including streams, downloads and purchases. The album totaled 162,000 units in traditional sales and 48 million streams, according to Nielsen Music, easily topping the first-week sales for the oddly popular two-person band Twenty One Pilots.

12. Documentary Feature: Free Solo

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Showcasing a dedication and prowess that seems superhuman, “Free Solo,” Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin’s invigorating portrait of the free climber Alex Honnold, is an easy sell to extreme sports enthusiasts. More sedentary viewers, though — perhaps less focused on the technical niceties of defying gravity — might discover something arguably even more fascinating in this layered documentary: A cautionary study of what can happen when you don’t hug your children.


Reference: The New York Times

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Milan Anshuman is a travel blogger at Roadway Star. He is passionate about travelling across entire India, specially in undiscovered places, apart from travelling he loves to shoot nature and wildlife beauties, waterfall, mountain series and beaches.

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